The Best of Everything. #Share Your World

This entry is part 13 of the series Share Your World

SC: I’ve been out of action with this challenge for a few week. This week, Cee Neuer asks some deep but fun questions in her Share Your World Challenge. Here are my answers.

SYW: wants to know: What would constitute a “perfect” day for you?

SC: A day relaxing at a resort with my entire family including my brother and his family. 

SYW: Complete this sentence: My favorite place in the whole world…..

SC:My favourite place in the whole world is the secluded beach on the outskirts of Gordon’s Bay in the Cape. It has trees overhanging the sand, a long beach walk, magnificent mountain scenery, and a fish and chip shop just up the road if you forgot to pack the sandwiches. We have been there with all three babies, so it holds special memories.

SYW: Who was your best friend in elementary school (prior to age 12)?

SC: Jackie Ford. We met when we lived in the same block of flats in Gwelo, Rhodesia (now called Gweru, Zimbabwe) when we were about due to start school. As only children, six months apart, we bonded instantly. We spent our free time from school (prior to 12) like sisters. We shared our mischief and our fun and rarely fought, which is more than can be said for our two dogs. Jackie’s cross foxy, Patches, and my Heinz 57, Brownie, hated each other with a vicious passion, despite the hours they were forced to spend together.

Both of our mothers went out to work, and we were supervised (sort of!) by our grandmothers. Poor old ladies. When I think what we put them through!

When we reached high school age (going on 13), our parents moved to opposite sides of town and we were forced to go to different high schools. So although we are still in touch today, mainly through Facebook, we ended up making new friends. Sadly, I don’t have one photo with us both in it. Jackie, if you’re reading this, do you have any?

SYW: What inspired you this past week? Feel free to use a quote, a photo, a story, or even a combination.

SC: Okay, you know what’s coming right? I returned from our 50th wedding celebration to 5 cutting dies from China, and a further 5 arrived during the week. One of them was a beautiful lacy umbrella. I had no idea why I’d ordered it and couldn’t find ideas for cards. It was too big to use it with other dies that I had. So I needed serious inspiration. Here’s a few of what transpired:

How about you?

1. What inspired you this week?

2. Would you like to join the Share Your World challenge? Cee posts a few questions each week, and all participants need do is answer them. It’s a cool way to get to know one another. The idea is to answer the questions without overthinking them and just have fun. If you are interested in joining this blogging challenge—just copy/paste the above questions into a new post and answer them. Then put the link for your post here: Cee’s Challenge.

 

It’s a Wonderful World

Originally published in 1 Jan 2008. Updated 3 May 2017.

 

Have you ever stopped to look around and marvel at the beauty that surrounds you each and every day?

Have we got so used to it, we take it for granted?

The New South Africa

In 1994, we in South Africa experienced the ushering in of “The New South Africa” as it was widely called. For a period, the euphoria spread across the nation as people of all color—black, brown, yellow and white—joined together under the new leadership of Nelson Mandela and F.W.de Klerk.

The Rainbow Nation

As a tribute to the new nation, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Prize-winner (1984) and political activist, coined the phrase, “The Rainbow Nation.” He saw us as one nation made up of all different colors.

A wonderful world

It’s clear that God loves color. We only need to look around at nature to see this. See the fiery reds and oranges of an African sunset compared to the coolness of a blue sky mirrored in a calm sea. See tiny shoots of yellow, pink or red as they push their way through the life-promising green to herald the arrival of Spring.

We only need to look at nature to see how God loved color! Click To Tweet

No color is better than another, yet a khaki rose would not compare with its red counterpart, and blue earth defies imagination. In the same way, God has also made us different. He didn’t mean us to be identical. We have different natures, life-styles, cultures and abilities. Our appearance differs, whether we look at hairstyles, physiques or skin colors. Yet, just as those colors join together to make one rainbow, we are called to be one people under God.

We have many parts in the one body, and all these parts have different functions. In the same way, though we are many, we are one body in union with Christ, and we are all joined to each other as different parts of one body. So we are to use our different gifts in accordance with the grace that God has given us (Romans 12:4-6a GNB. )

Take a look around

Look around you now, and take note of the colors you see in your surroundings. Red? √ Blue? √ Purple? √  Green? √ In fact, I can’t think of any color that I can’t see, and I haven’t moved from my computer seat!

How about you?

What colors can you see without leaving where you are?

Tell me something about yourself. What gifts do you have? Where do you live in our wonderful world?

I’d love to hear from you. Please leave a comment below and if you leave a live link, I’ll get back to you.

Other similar posts:

Even Elephants Communicate
The Shepherd with an Impossible Dream

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Y is for Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow

This entry is part 27 of the series Out of Africa

Y

I grew up in Gwelo, Rhodesia (now Gweru, Zimbabwe) before moving to South Africa in my late teens. Years later, together with our three young children, we spent several years in Salisbury (now Harare), the capital city of Rhodesia.

Whenever we were able to, we traveled to Gwelo to spend time with my parents who still lived in my childhood home. Rich green lawns with lots of space for playing, a beautiful rose garden, and a swimming pool, made it an ideal retreat for us, and the children loved to spend time at Granny and Grandpa’s home. read more

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S

In a few weeks time, my brother and sister-in-law are embarking on the trip of a lifetime.

For approximately four months, they will travel overland from their home in Johannesburg, South Africa, to the Serengeti Plains of Africa and then home again. During that time they hope to drive through nine different African countries, including Zimbabwe, Zambia, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique. read more

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This entry is part 3 of the series Out of Africa

AWelcome to the beautiful land of Africa, home to some 1.111 billion people of every colour skin known to man.

Since the age of four, this continent, the second largest land mass on our globe, has been my home. I am proud to be part of our exciting and diverse Rainbow Nation, and I look forward to sharing some of it with you over the next 30 days. read more

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This entry is part 4 of the series Story Behind the Book

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